Today’e episode is another solo venture. I wanted to spend a little time with you covering the 6 pillars of a a sustainably healthy lifestyle so you can stop focusing on the time sucks and start focusing on things that are actually going to move the needle in the right direction for you.

This episode is based on an article I published by the same name, The 6 Pillars of Achieving a Phenomenally Healthy Body and Mind

Registration is currently open for the October 1st session of Shut Down Your Sugar Cravings. You can get more information on the program and register at http://mycravingscode.com

Leave a comment and let me know your thoughts/feelings/obstacles/struggles/etc. below.

Comments

  • Shauna says:

    I love all if the podcasts Kevin! #84 rocked. I so agree not a one size fits all approach and so much is psychological. I’m saving my $ to do your course!
    You rock!

  • Ela says:

    Thanks for the explicit call to comment, Kevin! I’ve been meaning to comment or leave a review for a while. I’m pretty knowledgeable in this sphere, so the style and quality of presentation is what keeps me listening to a health/wellness podcast. I admire your passion, sincerity, and honesty. You seem to have an innate drive and talent for motivating yourself and others; I bet you’re a phenomenal coach. As a wordsmith myself, I appreciate your way with words also.
    Small piece of constructive criticism: sometimes it seems as though you’re trying to anticipate every objection, which is understandable but can be so hard. In this episode, toward the beginning when you say “eat real food,” I feel you tripped yourself up a bit by trying to address the “wheat is real food” potential objection. You talked about how wheat isn’t just eaten as is, all the ways that wheat is processed, but then you compared it to better alternatives like sweet potatoes and rice. But rice is at least as processed as wheat (and someone who knows the bible could quote you Jesus and his disciples walking through a field picking the wheat ears and nibbling off the kernels).
    I was just feeling for you as I listened to that, wishing you could leave that bit out and say something simpler, e.g. that lots of “natural/real” foods are not optimal to eat, (cf. “tobacco is natural”), whether because people have allergies or because of antinutrients, or whatever. Then, a bit later in the podcast, when genetic modification came up, would have been a perfect place to mention that wheat has been selectively bred (no pun intended) for millennia and is now also a candidate for gmo, and how scary that all is…
    So–that’s what I wanted to share with you. I hope you understand that this is in a spirit of support and admiration, wanting to help you do an even better job.
    Ela

    • Kevin Geary says:

      Thanks for the feedback Ela. I agree. It’s difficult to turn on a microphone and just start talking — sometimes things don’t always get said exactly as you’d hope or in the clearest way possible, especially when trying to internally edit examples for the intended audience (and not get overly complicated).

      I try to go back after the fact and come up with different examples or anecdotes to use next time the same subject comes up. So, your feedback is helpful in determining that direction for next time.

      Thanks.

      • Ela says:

        Thanks, Kevin! Yes, exactly! And I love your spontaneity and agree that the dance of “internally editing” versus “not overcomplicating” is super challenging.
        I’m grateful if my feedback was helpful, and I totally encourage you to go for it with the “spontaneous and edit later”–it showcases your magnificent passion so well.
        Ela

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