Have you tried Bulletproof Coffee yet? If not, you’re missing out. I’ve been a Bulletproof Coffee drinker since the recipe first made the rounds online and I’ve experienced some great benefits.

Of course, I’m not alone. Tens of thousands of people have jumped on the Bulletproof Coffee train and appear to be riding off into the sunset.

While there’s a ton of blog articles singing the praises of Bulletproof Coffee, I do want to highlight some of the disadvantages to Bulletproof Coffee consumption. I don’t want to be a party pooper, but I wouldn’t be doing my job if I hid the downsides.

Here’s three disadvantages to drinking Bulletproof Coffee on a regular basis:

1. If you’re not careful, Bulletproof Coffee can erode your metabolism through chronic, unconscious calorie restriction.

Bulletproof Coffee has a huge benefit: it provides a ton of energy and long-term satiation. Many people report being able to comfortably go 5-6 hours or more after drinking it before needing to eat again.

Following a concept called Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting, it’s not uncommon for people to use bulletproof coffee as a meal replacement.

One of the issues, though, is that it’s not just calories that are making you full. If it were just calories, it wouldn’t be a problem. Instead, it’s the coffee part of Bulletproof Coffee that does a lot of the job of turning off hunger.

Coffee has been shown to reduce hunger signals. Many people eat a light meal following the Bulletproof Coffee because they don’t feel very hungry. Then they’ll eat a normal dinner. If they’re not careful, they can unknowingly under-eat.

As this process is repeated day after day, the metabolism starts to down-regulate. One side effect of a down-regulated metabolism is less hunger, so people think they’re comfortable but they’re really just stuck in a metabolically destructive cycle.

If you’re experiencing a lack of motivation to be active, cold hands and feet, fatigue, or any other symptoms of metabolic decline, pause Bulletproof Coffee consumption and focus on significantly increasing nutrient-dense calories.

2. Bulletproof Coffee, when consumed as a meal replacement, can drastically reduce nutrient intake and possibly lead to deficiencies.

Converting your diet to real food is a tall order for many people. Naturally, people latch onto specific foods or meals they feel comfortable with and repeat them over and over again. This is okay in the beginning, but failing to branch out can lead to nutrition issues.

The fact that Bulletproof Coffee is easy, fast, and convenient makes it easy to abuse as a repeatable meal choice.

The problem is that you’re consuming 400-800 calories from a food source that’s significantly less dense in nutrients than most other real foods. As a rough estimation, you’re consuming about 1/3 the nutrients as if you ate a whole food meal.

Also an issue is the lack of nutritional diversity. Whenever you repeat the same meal day in and day out, you forfeit the opportunity to expose yourself to a wider range of nutrients. Over time, this can lead to nutrient deficiencies, especially if you’re not making up for this lack of diversity in your other meals.

I strongly advise against drinking Bulletproof Coffee on a daily basis as a meal replacement. If you do use it at all as a meal replacement, you should be deliberate about nutritional diversity in your other meals.

3. Consuming Bulletproof Coffee could lead to negative health outcomes.

I do believe that Bulletproof Coffee is healthy. I believe that saturated fat is essential. But I also know that by drinking Bulletproof Coffee, we’re consuming more saturated fat than ever before from a source that’s missing many other things found in real foods.

In the context of human history, we’ve never liquified saturated fat and poured it down the hatch to the degree we’re doing with Bulletproof Coffee. That’s not an argument against Bulletproof Coffee, it’s a warning that you’re sailing in uncharted waters.

It’s possible that consuming large amounts of saturated fat in this manner is beneficial. It’s possible that it’s a wash. It’s also possible that it’s destructive. The truth is: we don’t know.

For those of you who eat real, nutrient dense foods and stay active, this is less of a problem in my estimation. On the flip side, I’m very concerned about the people who jumped on the Bulletproof Coffee bandwagon who have otherwise disastrous diets and are mostly sedentary.

For these three reasons, I’ve refined my personal approach to Bulletproof Coffee. I’m not arguing against it and I’m not suggesting you stop drinking it, but I feel it’s important to make sure you understand both sides of the topic so you can make an informed decision.

Personally, I drink Bulletproof Coffee from time to time. I rarely use it as a meal replacement, though. I’m curious to know where you stand?

If you’ve never tried Bulletproof Coffee, you can get the recipe here.

Comments

  • Theresa says:

    Great article and warning, Kevin. Personally I do a modified version of the bulletproof concept, mixing 1 tbsp of kerrygold butter or mct oil into my decaf. I also eat a healthy breakfast with eggs, veggies and sausage. I stay full for 6 hours which takes me right up to lunchtime. I do this to get more healthy fats in my diet.

    • Shirley says:

      I have bulletproof coffee for breakfast 6:30with a scoop of protein powder. Then small protein and veg at 9:30 as not hungry but to keep me ticking over till lunch at 1pm protein fat and veg. 3:30 I have mozzarella basil and tomato snack to see me through till dinner at 6-7pm 🙂 like with anything it’s incorporating something into your diet sensibly.

  • Dave Rascoe says:

    Sam Gilkey good points.

  • Skip says:

    Bulletproof coffee is a short-cut to fat adaption. It primes the fat metabolism system with preferably 8-chain fatty acids. The “lack of nutrition” concern misses the point of intermittent fasting. In fact, if quality grass-fed butter is used you should be provided with natural fat soluble vitamins that are limited from other food sources. Especially K2. Butyrate (Almost exclusive to butter). Good omega 3/omega 6 ratio.

    Intermittent fasting helps metabolism by keeping it flexible. We live in cycles timed by our environment. BP coffee is a helpful way to keep things mixed.

    Its true consuming large amounts of saturated fats by this method is untested long term in our society. It has been tested in Tibet.

    • Kevin Geary says:

      Hi Skip, I’ve made the same arguments before. I don’t necessarily disagree with you. But I think the points I highlighted are still relevant regardless.

      • Jenn says:

        You make some good points. With US soil being depleted of minerals(Senate Document 264;1936) and our fruits and vegetables having a confirmed nutritional decline in nutrients(study from University of Texas 2004) consuming enough nutrient dense food is vital and difficult! But what about someone like me who has trouble keeping weight on? Is the best way to take with a meal or on its own? I do the intermittent fasting for hormesis, to rebuild my mitochondria. I also am doing it for the wonderful benefits coconut has on the brain. I do 1 TB grass fed butter and 1TB coconut oil. I tried the bullet tea in the morning but wasn’t hungry all day. So I am trying it with my lunch. I don’t know why but I can handle it better with my lunch and not mess up my ability to eat regular meals. There’s so many opinions out there.

  • Sam Hayes says:

    I like it too, but more with coconut oil than with butter (I save the butter for the vegetables).

  • Arden Ballard says:

    I drink it on average 2-3 times per week–alternating between this and eggs for breakfast. My lunches and dinners are usually pretty well varied, but this definitely makes me pay more attention. I do know that since I started this trend in breakfast (along with following tbr), my total cholesterol has dropped 30 points and my hdl has increased to positive numbers (mid to upper 60’s)

  • Primal Influence says:

    Definitely important for people to be aware of the possible downfalls of this new craze. As with everything, people need to learn about the pros and cons in order to make educated choices for their health. Good post 🙂

  • Susan A says:

    Only last week did I learn about coconut oil and start using it in my coffee to bring up my fat macros to where they need to be without consuming too much protein, and I love it! Besides the BPC, what are some other ways to get the fat we need without skewing the other macros?

    • Jason says:

      protein is even more healthier than fat for your body so be sure to always get a good intake. Proteins have way more functions than fat that increase your metabolism and brain functions as well. We’re made out of proteins not fat so eat those eggs and meat 🙂

    • Kevin Geary says:

      Coconut oil is probably the best source. The other source I highly recommend is homemade salad dressing with Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Balsamic. Avocado is also a good source.

  • Chantal says:

    I don’t know what is wrong with me but BPC has never curb my hunger ….I wish it would!!

  • As a clinician and fellow blogger, I agree with all your points. I also write about the effects of too little calories and nutrients in Paleo when we rely on fat to make us feel satiated. Geez, what happened to hunting and gathering?

    • James says:

      Are you the same Kevin that was somewhat apposed to starches in diets for most people, and the one that constanctly defened low carb diets and all their facets? If so, I’m glad you’re moved your stances with more understanding

      • Kevin Geary says:

        You left this comment in response to Beverly, but it appears directed at me. I’m not sure what you’re referring to. I’ve never been publicly for “low carb diets and all their facets.” I have debated on other blogs in which I asked questions and my questions were misconstrued as “statements” (because some people can’t discern the difference, which is unfortunate). If you search on this site, in which 99.9% of the articles are written by me, you will see my clear stance on carbohydrates and starches.

  • Tyler says:

    Hey all. I think I have an interesting version of this drink, and if it’s not that new or innovative i hope someone let’s me know so I can come up with something crazier:P

    Anyways, here’s what I use.
    1 half stick of butter(or a quarter bar of kerrigold),
    2 eggs, a large spoonful of coconut oil(because I’ve had trouble finishing mct at my usual hunts), some cinnonon, just a little but of salt and a splash of honey.

    I consider myself primal so I don’t stick so closely to the no carbs thing(not that that’s really relavant here). But I feel that this is the best way for me to make bullet proof coffee. It combines the best of several different versions I’ve seen and I basically get an entire breakfast in one 24 ounce thermos. I’m missing some fruits occasionally in the morning but those really aren’t hard to add in but I really like my version. I hope to get a little feedback from someone. Thanks!

  • Kit says:

    Fat probably won’t do you much harm. Coffee probably will.

    • Kevin Geary says:

      Care to expand?

      • Kit says:

        Humans have been consuming fat probably for a very long time. It is hard to overheat it on its own and bar massive overconsumption and sedentary living, it will only kill you if the lipid hypothesis is correct; of which increasing evidence is mounting against. Coffee was only found in Etheopia, and given pre state societies, it probably wasn’t widespread around the world during human evolution. Other stimulants were around for sure. Coffee stimulates the flight or fight response and overstimulation of that causes stress. Stress is a killer. How many people have ‘burnt out’ on coffee. Coffee is for healthy people and how many people can boldly make that claim without a hint of ego. I doubt the Etheopians historically lived our lives or consumed coffee like we do in the West.

      • Kevin Geary says:

        Intuitively, this makes sense. I’m just wondering if you have any studies that also point to truth here? The argument that it wasn’t widespread doesn’t automatically mean it’s unhealthy. I’m sure your stress conclusion is right, but it’s highly dependent on context and individuality.

      • Kit says:

        No studies, just expressing an opinion. I also believe that several of the studies are paid for by industry and therefore not unbiased. The fact that it wasn’t widespread, coversely, doesn’t mean it is healthy. I agree that it is very dependent on the individual. I have to take breaks from coffee every so often, as it causes me distress from what I think to be hormone depletion. Going back to my original statement, I think that a conversation about what type of fat etc. in one’s coffee, may not address the ‘elephant in the room’, in that coffee is a powerful substance that has become ‘everyday’ because of culture. When cocaine was first introduced to Europe, it was in shakers at the tables of many of the upper class. Speed was used as an appetite suppressant, and is still used it Thailand as an appetite suppressant (was a decade ago).

  • Dr. John says:

    You got any clinical trials to back up your claims?
    How does “caffeine, in combination with relatively empty calories, artificially reduces hunger signals”. What’s the physiology behind this?

    How about: “As this process is repeated day after day, the metabolism starts to down-regulate.” Thyroid/adrenals/BMR/T3? What’s going on there?

    “….problem is that you’re consuming 400-800 calories from a food source that’s significantly less dense in nutrients than most other real foods.” So you’re saying the body doesn’t have the capacity to recognize this and satiety hypothalamic signals are just “calorie-based” vs. nutrient density? This is one of the core reasons humans over-eat due to consuming empty calories in processed foods, leading to overweight/obesity issues today. Americans consume more calories today due to unsatisfied hunger signals from consuming less nutrient density foods. This leads to overweight stats today.

    “I strongly advise against drinking Bulletproof Coffee on a daily basis as a meal replacement.” Then your say: “I do believe that Bulletproof Coffee is healthy.”
    Either something is healthy or not. It’s not about timing or frequency. If you want to cheat, then by all means cheat. But call something what it is….not based upon how offen you do it….how about smoking for instance?

    Have a cigarette with your “Bulletproof Coffee from time to time.”???

    Dr. John

    • Darla says:

      Finally.

    • Kevin Geary says:

      How does “caffeine, in combination with relatively empty calories, artificially reduces hunger signals”. What’s the physiology behind this?

      It could probably be worded clearer. Caffeine suppresses hunger, would you agree? In combination with pure fat, that’s going to give you very long-term hunger without much in the way of nutrients. Yes?

      “….problem is that you’re consuming 400-800 calories from a food source that’s significantly less dense in nutrients than most other real foods.” So you’re saying the body doesn’t have the capacity to recognize this and satiety hypothalamic signals are just “calorie-based” vs. nutrient density? This is one of the core reasons humans over-eat due to consuming empty calories in processed foods, leading to overweight/obesity issues today. Americans consume more calories today due to unsatisfied hunger signals from consuming less nutrient density foods. This leads to overweight stats today.

      Is this a question?

      “I strongly advise against drinking Bulletproof Coffee on a daily basis as a meal replacement.” Then your say: “I do believe that Bulletproof Coffee is healthy.”
      Either something is healthy or not. It’s not about timing or frequency. If you want to cheat, then by all means cheat. But call something what it is….not based upon how offen you do it….how about smoking for instance?

      This is an interesting argument. I suppose it depends on how you define healthy. Water is healthy — have you seen what happens when you drink too much of it? I don’t think your “it’s not about timing or frequency” statement holds up to scrutiny.

      • Dr. Joh says:

        Please provide clinical trials to back your claims….

      • Kevin Geary says:

        I’ve corrected the use of the word “caffeine” as the appetite suppressant, choosing instead use “coffee.” And linked to a study on the appetite suppression effects of coffee.

        I’ve also linked to metabolic down-regulation based on caloric deficit.

      • PhilT says:

        The metabolic down regulation link refers to <200 kcal/day reduction, which is typical of such studies – and some show a smaller or no reduction at all. There is the confounder of weight loss in the linked study, and they were obese kids.

  • Niall says:

    I drink bulletproof coffee every day but substitute coconut oil for MCT. As a rosacea sufferer it’s taken me 5 years experimenting to find a diet that is nutrient dense but also reduces the inflammatory response that causes rosacea. I consider myself “primal” and follow the TACFIT protocols for exercise along side their deitary requirements which I tweak to fit.

    I fast intermittently and find that when my nutrition is spot on I’ve endless energy, however if I miscalculate I do have energy slumps and have to adapt accordingly.

    Bulletproof coffee for me is part of a healthy nutritious diet and not a substitute for anything. When you start to replace whole food with ANY supplements then that’s when the problems start.

    Nice article. Thanks for writing.

  • Dr. John says:

    “Coffee has been shown to reduce hunger signals. ”
    Eleven male volunteers? Really? You think that is a fair representation of our society?

    “As this process is repeated day after day, the metabolism starts to down-regulate.”
    64 overweight children cannot be considered to be healthy in a study about health. Of course, 6 weeks in a clinical study is extremely short for any examination of dietary effects.
    Problems with “clinical trials”: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-nowinski-phd/the-new-grief-the-dark-si_b_748478.html

    • Kevin Geary says:

      I’m well aware of problems with studies. But your blind dismissal is unhelpful and proves nothing.

      • Dr. John says:

        Your quoted studies are myopic, weak, and poorly designed.
        That was my point.
        Nor do you understand satiety signals in hypothalamic brain areas correlated to overeating and hyper stimulation in humans.
        Where is your evidence regarding your statement:
        “…people who jumped on the Bulletproof Coffee bandwagon who have otherwise disastrous diets and are mostly sedentary.”
        I seriously doubt the “Bulletproof Coffee bandwagon” adherents are sedentary. I would venture to say most are from “paleo-land” and very slender and very active.
        Where’s your evidence for your statement?

        You’re saying “I do believe that Bulletproof Coffee is healthy. ” Yet humans have never done this in history….then why would you say this stuff is healthy.
        Your post is filled with inaccuracies and contradictions.

      • Kevin Geary says:

        John,

        I’m willing to think critically about this and even change my stance. What I’m not willing to do is tolerate your own lack of evidence and your piss poor attitude.

        Do you know what those studies I posted are better than? They’re better than the ZERO studies you’ve posted since you got here.

        Surely you’re educated enough to know that you can’t just dismiss studies. If you want to prove me wrong, stop flapping your lips and PROVE me wrong.

        You’re saying “I do believe that Bulletproof Coffee is healthy. ” Yet humans have never done this in history….then why would you say this stuff is healthy.
        Your post is filled with inaccuracies and contradictions.

        Do you know what term, “I believe…” means? It means it’s an opinion, John.

      • Alan Gernet says:

        There is always a ‘wanna-be doc’ in the house’! The fact is – Kevin is not trying to mislead anybody – only those people without the ability to do critical thinking have a little trouble …..

  • John Mason says:

    Another poorly researched dig at the health benefits of natural fat…poorly disguised as an attempt to be unbiased.

  • Gary says:

    I drink bulletproof coffee after my preworkout meal before my workouts. I never use it as a meal replacement and had no idea that other people do. It is a great preworkout boost and I have never found that it is so filling that I have no desire to eat either before or after my workouts. So the danger that you warn of Mark is only applicable for those who use bulletproof coffee as a meal substitute. I doubt that many people will have a cup of bulletproof coffee and then lose their appetite for 5 or 6 hours as you suggest. This is especially true for those of us who workout after consuming bulletproof coffee. If you train hard enough there is no such thing as a cup of coffee that will replace a postworkout meal, no matter how bulletproof it is. Just stick to eating primal as you so perfectly lay out and you can’t go wrong.

    • Kevin Geary says:

      A *ton* of people are using it as a meal replacement. It sounds like you’ve found what’s working for you and that’s a great thing. Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts.

      • Brad says:

        I did it for a short while, then I realized that using one or two free range eggs instead of butter and/or MCT give similar benefits due to the yolk fat, but you get a shit ton more nutrients from the eggs – vitamins, minerals, omega-3, and the full gamut of amino acids (protein). Now I usually use eggs, a bit of gelatin, and touch of cinnamon. Sweeten usually with Stevia. Been doing it for over a year now.

      • Brad says:

        Mark Sisson blogged about something similar “primal egg coffee”. I was doing it months before his blog post 😉

  • Austin says:

    Very well written article… something that’s needed to be said but no wants to say.

    “In the context of human history, we’ve never liquified saturated fat and poured it down the hatch to the degree we’re doing with Bulletproof Coffee. That’s not an argument against Bulletproof Coffee, it’s a warning that you’re sailing in uncharted waters.”

    Beautifully written. I love the evolutionary approach because it makes so much practical sense. I am a fan of BPC, but only for certain occasions… maybe twice a week no more. BALANCE

  • Scott Hall says:

    MegHan Watkins

  • Gunnar Fox says:

    I like raw eggs in my coffee also but my goal is intermittent fasting… So protein in the morning clearly derails that objective.

    so unless I am putting no more than around 5 grams of fat in my coffee (a smidge of butter and some MCT oil) I can’t really call that IF. I know it has been speculated that from a metabolic point of view the body interprets fat consumption as the same as pure fasting… So in theory you could stir your BPC with a stick of butter until it melts down to a nub. But I have trouble with that idea intuitively.

    I do find that even a teensy amount of fat leads to greater satiety than the catechines/caffeine from coffee alone.

  • Laurence says:

    Interesting read and timely.

    Just got some diagnostics back today – fatty liver and minor renal failure. Way too soon to say what the specific culprits are.

    I’ve been Paleo & intermittent fasting for over three years now.

    I’ve concentrated on high saturated fats (butter, animal, coconut), moderate protein and low carb. Have been doing BP coffee for a year and a half. Big fan of Dave. However, epigenetics is a huge variable and I’m finding so whatever your dietary approach is… listen to your body.

    If anyone has sources that I could research on my specific issues, would be hugely helpful in my ongoing investigation.

    Cheers

    Laurence

    • Beth says:

      Lawrence… Similar here… yes, did BPC for a year. Stopped menstrating, developed very high cholesterol, fatty liver and gallbladder had to be removed because it stopped working.

  • malo says:

    Nutritional density is my biggest concern. Same with 90% of processed food which is consumed by millions of Americans as their primary food stuff. Food that is also engineered to keep you hungry. So food with no nutrition that keeps you full or keeps you hungry?

    Also there’s calorie restriction = longevity studies all over. LMGTFY.

    But take cereal grains for example. They not only contain ZERO nutrition they contain anti nutrients. It was proven in the 1960s cardboard is healthier than cereal. So the solution was add vitamins to cereal. Now we are finding these fats have no nutrients but trigger satiety markers. Fats with a vitamin sounds better than cereal with a vitamin (and up to 70% sugar).

  • Pamela says:

    As a coffeeholic I would liked to propose the issue of too much acid. My body has become extremely acidic, which of course is opening the door to all kinds of disease like cancer and has made my body very receptive to hosting candida. I went on a 11 week fast from it, and admit that I did gain weight from giving it up because coffee definitely curbs my appetite – straight coffee, nothing else added. I’m getting back on coffee because I have missed it so much. I do squeeze lemon or lime into my morning water however to counteract some of the acidic effects from coffee because citrus fruits alkalize in the body. Hope this helps others in their decisions.
    Pamela

  • Ellie says:

    Thanks for the article Kevin, I have to agree with you based on my own experience. I am a holistic nutritionist, a cross-fitter and a trainer and I’m cautious about recommending bulletproof coffee to my female clients for exactly the reasons you highlighted.
    I started drinking bulletproof coffee about a year ago, with butter and coconut oil and a dash of cinnamon. I was also following a strict paleo “reset” for six weeks, but it wasn’t until I added the bulletproof coffee that my body fat started melting off. I continued to drink it and experimented with Dave’s coffee beans and his MCT oil. When I switched to the MCT oil my lips peeled…I have no idea why. When I stopped the MCT oil, the peeling stopped. I was often drinking two BPC a day and my appetite was seriously low. I was only eating one meal a day, and even that was forced. There was just NO way I could even eat enough protein to sustain my lean mass (about 100grams/day), let alone a wide variety of vegetables if I drank two BPC in a day. Even one BPC in the morning suppresses my appetite so that I’m not hungry until 2pm or later.
    After a while i started gaining fat and I was getting nauseated after drinking it. I would assume that’s due to weakened fat digestion, but I don’t know for sure. I took a break from it for a while and when I added it back in I skipped the butter and stuck to coconut oil instead of MCT oil. I haven’t had any problems since then, but I think too much BPC did a number on my metabolism and it most certainly suppressed my appetite to a detrimental level.
    I’m completely off coffee right now, as I like to go off it a couple of times a year to make sure my adrenals aren’t fatigued and get a clear picture of my health status. When I pick coffee up again I will be careful with BPC and only drink it a few times a week. It’s easy to abuse it I find, which is why I hesitate to introduce it to my clients that aren’t necessarily willing or able to pay attention to their own body’s health signals.
    Thanks again for your article, it was helpful for me for sure.

  • Stephen Brown says:

    How much MCT is there in a whole coconut? I bet you significantly less than what gets gulped down here. Have you ever eat a whole coconut in one go?

    I intermittent fast, but properly – you know, without any calories, only water. So I’m not fooling my body.

  • Alan Gernet says:

    Hi Kevin. Something is confusing me a little. I am trying to only eat when I am hungry – and usually only have 2 meals per day. I have a few nuts with coconut oil in the early morning, and am usually not hungry until lunch time when I eat a salad and avo on a normal day. Sometimes it is with added cheese or a protein, and with a dressing of lemon juice, balsamic, avo/olive oil. I am not hungry again even at supper time. I eat supper -usually have a ‘fist sized’ protein and a lower-carb veggie or two. Supplement daily with vitamins, minerals, omega3, Lysine and Leucine (gym or exercise in some manner daily). I was under the impression that I should only eat when hungry, and the early morning fat seems to control my hunger (like BPC). Now, after reading this, I am concerned about eating too little and possibly not getting enough variety. My energy levels and fitness are good, and I have lost 13kg in 4 months, and am still losing weight/size slowly. Obviously, when I reach my target weight (+- 7 kg to go), I will increase my intake of foods. Currently eating zero gluten products or sugar, other than in a natural state. Am I going wrong in my approach?

    • Kevin Geary says:

      It’s hard to say. Have you added up your total calories for a day just to see where you’re at? That’s probably the best way to determine if you’ve fallen into a cycle of chronic calorie restriction.

      • Alan says:

        No Kevin – I have not been looking at calories at all, and I have no way of knowing what amount of calories are expended doing exercise like swimming, walking and weights.
        So my question really is – should I eat only when hungry, or should I be ‘force feeding’ myself with low-carb foods when not hungry, or should I stop eating coconut oil early in the day in case it is suppressing my appetite too much?

      • Kevin Geary says:

        I would experiment with the last one. But I’d also throw your meals into a calorie tracker for a day and just see what it spits out. While you can’t calculate exactly what you need, sometimes I have people do this and the number that comes out is shocking, which automatically sheds light on the issue, know what I mean?

        For example, if it says you’re eating 1800 calories a day, it’s a really good bet you’ve found your culprit.

  • RebootedBody says:

    @Pamela There’s actually no strong evidence to support the idea that foods can change the PH of the blood, if that’s what you’re referring to.

  • Thomas says:

    “If you’re experiencing a lack of motivation to be active, cold hands and feet, fatigue, or any other symptoms of metabolic decline, pause Bulletproof Coffee consumption and focus on significantly increasing nutrient-dense calories.”

    Thanks for writing this article Kevin.

    I believe I found the reason for my cold hands and feat.

    I had said to myself I would only drink coffee after eating breakfast. So I think I’ll start doing this ever day from now on.

  • Kimberly says:

    I’ve never been a big breakfast eater,(coffee and a handful of nuts) and never had any real issues about weight. I’m 5’10” and 140 pounds.(48 years old) I feel most comfortable between 132 and 135, but the last couple years, I’ve found it difficult to get there and impossible to stay there. My muscle has decreased and my fat has increased despite a minimum of 4 days a week at the gym and a healthy diet. This all led me to try the bulletproof diet. I’ve been doing this for 5 days and already lost 3 pounds. The problem is that I’ve never felt more hungry in my life, after I drink this BPC in the morning. I’m following the recipe exactly, including using the XTC oil. Not only am I starving an hour or two after the coffee, but I have no energy whatsover and headaches and total brain fog. What could be going on ? I am afraid of adding more butter. This diet is already going against everything I thought I knew about healthy eating.(especially about not eating nuts and seeds. These have always been a staple in my diet, along with yogurt and cheese)
    Kimberly

    • Cory says:

      The hunger should go away after a week or two (sometimes more) when you become fat adapted – your body is likely still looking for sugars. You can try adding more butter but over 2 tbs is probably unnecessary.

      If you are female, make sure you are getting some carbs at night, like sweet potatoes, berries, white rice, raw honey. Zero carbs can lead to serious fatigue next day.

      Also try dialing back the oil. My father had the same issue with mid day brain fog and I uncovered that he was doing 2 tbs butter 2 tbs MCT and 2 tbs Fish Oil. That’s a lot of oil on an empty stomach! These concentrated oils are serious irritants to the gut if you don’t absorb them and they make it that far – and gut irritation = brain fog.

      Dial back the oil a bit until you find your absorption limit, over time you should be able to dial it back up.

  • ramon prakash says:

    I use it as a pre work out drink now..

  • Lesley says:

    Hi Kevin great article very infromative indeed. I need your help I just recently started doing the BP coffee literally on Sunday and i must say the loss of appetite is astounding and it has me slightly worried. The first time I drank it before eating breakfast at around 07:30 in the morning, i didnt eat anything the whole day just drank a ton of water throughout the day. Finally around 18:00 had to force myself by eating a piece of chicken and some lettuce. Same thing happened the following day and today i adjusted the recipe from 1 Tbsp of butter and MCT oil to a teaspoon of each, didnt have the same energy as the first two days and my appetite returned. Out of all the posts I’ve seen about BPC mostly people normally have something to eat after luch time or a few hours after drinking the coffee. Any advise you can throw my way will be greatly appreciated.

  • RG says:

    I’m all about low carb, healthy fats and quality proteins. I’ve been eating healthy and low carb for over 30 years. Before BP coffee I ate 2 eggs and and avocados pretty much every morning. and switched to BP coffee. Now I feel nausea, like I want to vomit, week and dizzy right until about 3pm when i’m about to have my first meal….this is not the way i want to feel…where’s that alert feeling that Dave promises

  • Julian W says:

    Utter unsupported bullshit… sorry..if you’re making statements like this you have to start with either, “this is my opinion, unsupported but based on articles I’ve read” or cite the peer reviewed evidence to support what you are saying.

    • Kevin Michael Geary says:

      Typically, people who are only capable of using insults and not making arguments or offering rebuttals aren’t worth spending time on. But, I’ll give you another chance. Do you have a specific rebuttal to one of the arguments made?

  • Nita says:

    Well, I researched this topic because I have been drinking BPC for about 5 months, maybe 2 -3 times a week. I’m 64 yo female who runs 2 miles a day, walks 4 miles with my German Shepherd 3 times a week, and weight lifts 3 times a week. I’m outside a lot and work 30 acres too. Not sedentary. Very attentive to my health numbers.
    So all of a sudden, I started getting gall bladder pain and ended up in the ER. Now it has happened again and I’m due for an ultra sound. The only common denominator is the MCT oil and Ghee butter. I’m worried I may have done permanent damage to my gall bladder. I have seen some other articles referencing gall bladder issues too. I may try the BPC without the oils. But for now, just wanted to share with you.

  • Tom says:

    Is it important that you use a certain type of coffee? I have heard the toxins in your average coffee are very low and that the inventor of the Bulletproof coffee is just recommending his brand because he charges 3-4 times the cost of your average coffee.
    Does it make much of a difference if you add a little cream and some honey or Stevia to the Bulletproof coffee? I would imagine that it doesn’t take long to burn off those calories. I like it and lost 6-8 pounds in the first week then added a little a couple days later. I like the energy and feeling full until around 3:00 in the afternoon, but I wont drink it everyday. I also drink “Green drinks with 5-6 different raw fruits and veggies to make sure I don’t miss out on my nutrients. I am 54 years old, work out 2-4 times a week in Boot camps and running 3-5 miles at a clip. I am hoping this coffee will help me carve off some fat in places that are hard to drop it around the love handles. Thanks for your article.
    All the best,
    Tom

    • Kevin Michael Geary says:

      Hi Tom,

      No, the mycotoxin issue is mostly a myth.

      Adding any sugar to the coffee will change the effect, yes. Stevia is fine, though.

  • Liz says:

    What if you eat carbs while consuming BP coffee? Isn’t mixing the two then suddenly detrimental rather than healthy? So I can’t have bread with BP coffee?

    • Kevin Michael Geary says:

      What does bread do you for you that you really want to eat it with coffee? Most people in this community avoid bread because it’s relatively empty calories and tends to be an obstacle to them reaching their goals.

  • Doug says:

    I have been using it for 3 months as a meal replacement in the morning only. Then I drink an Atkins protein shake (20 grams protein, vitamins and minerals) with unsweetened almond milk (no carbs). Then a high protein, low fat, very low carb dinner. This is not a lifestyle choice, but a weight loss choice. When I get to 35 pounds total loss I’m going to introduce the right kind of carbs gradually but still drink one cup of BPC in the morning.
    I have been experiencing what feels like kidney pain on my right side back. And it’s a throbbing (slight) for a couple of weeks. Might have over done it? I know others doing this more extreme than I have been with zero health issues or pain – brother lost 60 pounds in 9 months doing BPC in the AM and then Atkins throughout the day. Anyone else with kidney / gall bladder / etc. issues?
    Thanks for this article!

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